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Behind TINY

Today in New York pop-up shop opening day.

The TINY font family was originally created at over the summer of 2018 as the visual identity for an experimental retail pop-up shop in Chinatown, New York City called “Today in New York”, or TINY for short. The shop was the result of an intern project at Verdes, a creative agency, between Jack Halten Fahnestock and Théïa Flynn. There they sold T-shirts and tote bags customized on the spot with a fancy (and stupid expensive) handheld inkjet printer called a HandJet EBS-250.

Printing a customer’s message on a shirt.

Two of the HandJet’s default typefaces, 16x10 and 7x5, were recreated into usable fonts for mocking up designs on tees and totes, respectively.

HandJet EBS-250 default typefaces 16x10 and 7x5 recreated as fonts.

T-shirt and tote back side mockup using 16x10 and 7x5, respectively.

5x4, the smallest type size found in the HandJet’s software using only 5 of the 16 available print heads, was also made. To take it a bit further and really play up the fun of the end product various widths were created but ultimately only used briefly as they were made last-minute.

Instagram post showing various widths of 5x4.

TINY 5x3 is just the initial release with a long-term plan to add additional widths up to at least 5x13, and variable axes in future updates. This debut release includes 1300+ glyphs and a variable dot size, which comes from the HandJet’s adjustable ink output feature.

Download Tiny 5x3

Getting carried away w/ excitement and forgetting to adjust the ink level for a thinner fabric.

Stay tuned :)

Published on April 2, 2019 by Jack Halten Fahnestock

The Origins of Ouroboros

At the end of 2016, I was really inspired by Elmer Stefan’s project of reviving Victorian typefaces under the guise of The Pyte Foundry. I wanted to create a typeface that was intentionally expressive and ornamental, with a kind of flair that I felt was missing from the open-source type scene.

Based on this premises, my initial concept was to draw letter shapes with a very large serif area, as large as possible, which then I could “carve” in order to create a myriad of decorative effects.

Early tests - “carved” letters (gruyerè A, hollow I and almost unreadable M).

With this idea in mind, I started doing some pencil sketches of these kind of letters. Their serifs were so large, that they created concave counter-forms between the letters that were oval-shaped, or egg-shaped sometimes. The openings on the letters would be very narrow (as for the letter E) and, sometimes, they would overlap themselves in a weird way (this idea was later abandoned). This produced a visual aspect for the capitals not unlike bubbles in dark ink spreading through the page, or at least that’s how I saw it.

Some of the earliest sketches of what would later become Ouroboros - I hadn’t sorted the serif positions yet. Look at those bell-bottoms!

Based on these sketches, I started to trace some letters on the computer. When I had a doubt about how a particular letter would be constructed, I would use Benguiat as a reference, so Ouroboros is relatively influenced by it.

Correcting by hand some of the early digital designs.

Because I based my design solely on vertical and horizontal anchors, drawing some of the letters, like the Z and the X, proved to be quite a challenge. It was necessary to strike a delicate balance to keep the strokes consistent with those of the other letters, and at the same time keeping the impression of a diagonal stroke.

Some early versions of the X and the Z vs their final forms - they’ve come a long way.

In addition to letters like the H (which were rather square, with a strong vertical axis), there were some others like the S and the J which were quite asymmetrical and curved in a sensuous way. The spline of the S is quite narrow compared to the rest of the strokes, and its shape mimics the gesture of someone pressing a paint brush on a support while applying a circular motion. This is a deliberate reference to art nouveau letters, which were often produced with brushes, rather than with pens. Some other details, like some of the accents, also recall brush strokes.

By that time of the design, the name I had in mind was “Circus Maximus” (I saw it as a tongue-in-cheek nod to Momus’ debut album rather than to classic Rome). My initial intentions were to create an extended style of the typeface so it could be used to compose  circus posters, with letters of different widths. But with some letter shapes, like the O, this approach didn’t work so well.

Preliminary extended versions of Ouroboros that didn’t make the cut.

The problem was that 1) the name “Circus Maximus” was already taken by an existing font and specially 2) the typeface didn’t feel so circus-like after all. But one day, I came upon the name “Ouroboros” and all the pieces of the puzzle fell in place. The name wasn’t taken by any existing font, it conveyed the magic and fantasy feeling that I wanted to express, and most important of all, the O shape that I had drawn looked like an actual Ouroboros! So, it was perfect for this project.

Ouroboro’s infamous “O” vs the creature as depicted in the Codex Parisinus graecus 2327, a copy of an early medieval manuscript. The circle was complete.

During online conversations with Sébastian Hayez, who was an early fan of the typeface, the will of creating lowercase characters slowly started to take shape.

Ouroboros’ lowercase letters take some cues from ornamental typefaces such as Deberny & Peignot Les Modernes [here seen on the “Les Locomotives” title] [later released as DeVinne Ornamental by Stephenson Blake around 1900, today owned by Linotype], which can be commonly found on antique French postcards.

As for the numerals, my main inspiration [and a massive, ongoing obsession during the last months] were vintage number signs found all around Paris.

Hunting for numbers, day and night.

Some crude sketches for the numerals

The relationship between Art Nouveau letter shapes and magical themes was a strong one [Check out Manuel Orazi’s Calendrier Magique over at Gallica.fr if you have the time], and the Ouroboros is also an important symbol for alchemy, so the next logical step was the development of magical and alchemical symbols. The challenge here was keeping the same calligraphic feel and mood of the letters on symbols that 1) were radically different at times and specially 2) were so complex that the same stroke width [present on the rest of the letters] could not be maintained.

“A Table of Mediaeval Alchemical Symbols” from Basil Valentine’s The Last Will and Testament [c.1670] [detail]. Alchemical symbols were originally drawn on manuscripts [even if metal-cast versions of some symbols exist] and their representation varied wildly between authors. Contrary to the letters of the latin alphabet, there’s no general guide about how to draw them [and specially where their baselines should be placed exactly!], so the ones you see in Ouroboros are my personal interpretation.

Some of Ouroboros symbols compared to a capital A. As alchemical symbols come from very varied sources and authors, it was difficult to keep a homogeneous look. For the smallest circle shapes of the symbols, the contrast of the stroke disappears, as it happens when one tries to draw a very small circle with ink, instead of a large one.

After a preliminary online publication of the font on October 10th 2018 up at Font Library, the people over at Velvetyne told me that they were really interested in releasing it (we know each other for some years now actually). The date of the 31st October was proposed (just in time for Halloween). Between these two dates, I went a little bit crazy improving the kerning, fine-tuning the design of some characters and adding new symbols, accents and stylistic sets. 130 ligatures were implemented, as well as positional variants, which allowed the text to become a bit more compact, specially for texts set in all-caps. As for the resulting font, you can check it yourself by downloading it.
 
See you later, alligators!

Download Ouroboros!

Published on January 2, 2019 by Ariel Martín Pérez

The short but real VTF Lack story

Lack typeface project began in 2012 when Adrien was commissioned by Rio Nebulane, an electronic music band, to create their first album cover.

Rio Nebulane, First album. Design, illustration and typography : Adrien Midzic, 2012.

The fisrt thing achieved for this work was a visual language etablishment inspired by hieroglyph’s system. Then, a certain legibility became to be necessary to read at least the band name. So Adrien started to search an option to keep this mysterious visual flavor about hieroglyphs into a custom font. This first fruits are really important in the story of Lack, because the research of the limits of ligibility inside the letterform comes from here.

Logotype for test

The research leads design of some letters to compose the band name Rio Nebulane. After many tests proceed to find the good proportions and legibility, the logotype was ready.

Rio Nebulane, logotype, Adrien Midzic, 2012

Back in time, the first Open Type features

The previous tests offered a large choice of letter forms and Adrien wanted to keep them as much as possible. He discovered the Open Type font format. It was a big joy to play and work with this features for the first time. A stylistics set was added to the Lack.

Sample specimen of VTFLack first edition, Adrien Midzic, 2013

Where put and publish this strange font?

Adrien, really proud of this typeface searched a way to promote it. He found the perfect solution with Velvetyne Type Foundry, the really kind guys fascinated by all typographic fields, indeed the most strange.

So, Lack joined the VTF font catalogue in 2013, and it was the first free-font designed by Adrien Midzic.

It could live her own life and been used by graphics designer to serve their graphic design works.

Africavivre website. Design Clément Lecocq

Lack Specimen, a student work. Design : Maxime Barbier

3 years later, a trip and a new friend

Travels is always a good thing, in 2017, Adrien went in Greece for vacation and had the idea to try to make a greek font on his come back. Lack was a perfect typeface for that. He draw the greek letters inspired by his own shoots. At the same time a russian friend come in his life, and he decides to make Lack a real multilungual font! It helps him to draw the letter to make any mistake, because like the Greek alphabet, Cyrillic is really different.

Annoucement of the greek VTFLack version

Annoucement of the Cyrillic VTFLack version

Lack are being met

So in 2018, both of visuals and linguistics missing of Lack are being met.

VTFLack is now updated, it is a brave, contemporary and experimental typeface. It gives you the opportunity to compose in Cyrillic, Greek and latin. It comes in a single weight with her Italic. It started by extending the first VTFLack font edition, designed by Adrien Midzic in 2013. It works well as a display typeface, but is also designed to perform in all kind of texts sizes. Some crazy surprises are hidden into 3 stylistics sets.

Now the Lack’s emblematic set with its crazy uppercases is available in two stylistic sets called O.V.N.I-1 and O.V.N.I-2.

Another set named “Alternate” has also been created, in which alternative forms for some tiny ones are available.

Download the new Lack!

Published on March 12, 2018 by Adrien Midzic
All Articles
Type Workshop: Imago Mundi Mei30 Apr 2019Behind TINY02 Apr 2019Typefaces from a Solarpunk Future at Fig. Festival25 Feb 2019The Origins of Ouroboros02 Jan 2019Utopie & langage (feat. VTF Mourier)15 Nov 2018Le Murmure09 Nov 2018The short but real VTF Lack story12 Mar 2018Designers posters for Trickster01 Mar 2018Hyper Scrypt12 Sep 2018Trickster, a postmortem28 Feb 2018Mariant la Truie et l'Ourse : double release party on 27/11/201721 Nov 2017Pre-order the 288 ampersands book till Sunday, September the 10th08 Sep 2017Public talk — Polices de France08 Jun 2017Velvetyne in Chaumont festival 201722 May 2017New workshop: Saint J&an13 Apr 2017We now accept donations!24 Jan 2017Solide Mirage18 Jan 2017Bluu Upgrade14 Oct 2016New workshop FONT > FONK > FORK26 Apr 2016Grotesk for Paris.fr17 Jan 2017Result of the vote for Millimetre06 Apr 2016Launch of La Perruque magazine06 Apr 2016Des Gens En Photo17 Jan 2017Vote for Millimetre24 Mar 2016Steps Mono for Étapes Magazine17 Jan 2017